KLM uses cookies.

KLM’s websites use cookies and similar technologies. KLM uses functional cookies to ensure that the websites operate properly and analytic cookies to make your user experience optimal. Third parties place marketing and other cookies on the websites to display personalised advertisements for you. These third parties may monitor your internet behaviour through these cookies. By clicking ‘agree’ next to this or by continuing to use this website, you thereby give consent for the placement of these cookies. If you would like to know more about cookies or adjusting your cookie settings, please read KLM’s cookie policy.

브라우저가 이전 버전입니다.
KLM.com의 모든 기능을 안전하게 사용하려면 브라우저를 업데이트하거나 다른 브라우저를 사용하실 것을 권장 드립니다. 이 버전을 계속 사용하는 경우 웹 사이트의 일부 또는 전부가 제대로 표시되지 않을 수 있습니다. 업데이트된 브라우저를 사용하면 개인 정보 역시 더 잘 보호됩니다.

 

Resistance Museum

The interactive exhibitions in Amsterdam’s Resistance Museum provide an impressive insight into the Netherlands in WWII. During this period, from 1940-1945, several Dutch people did their best to undermine the German occupation at great risk to their own lives. The fascinating collection is based on personal stories that showcase all the different actions undertaken by the Dutch in wartime.

The reconstructed streets with life-sized photos reflect the atmosphere in the Netherlands just before, during and just after WWII. The large hall shows the daily life of the Dutch in wartime while intimate alcoves present the clandestine actions of the resistance movement. There is also a dedicated exhibition for children aged 9-14, telling the story of 4 children who each experienced the war in their own unique way.

The exterior of the Dutch Resistance Museum
The exterior of the Dutch Resistance Museum

암스테르담

Wartime dilemmas

After the German invasion, things became increasingly tough in the Netherlands as hunger and poverty took hold. In the meantime the Jewish population suffered an ever greater persecution. Many of the Dutch faced a difficult choice: participate, do nothing or join the resistance. The permanent exhibition in the Resistance Museum explains how the Dutch dealt with this dilemma. Personal stories and quotes support the authentic objects on display.
The Dutch resistance movement came into action almost immediately after the German invasion. There were overt actions against the occupier, such as strikes and student protests, as well as clandestine operations. The illegal press, for instance, undermined German censorship, and forging papers was a matter of course. Sabotage and deadly attacks by the resistance also occurred. The largest Dutch resistance movement was the LO (Landelijke Organisatie – a national organisation to help people go into hiding). It helped approximately 300,000 people find places to hide, including 25,000 Jews.

Hidden gun of a resistance fighter

War in the Dutch East Indies

The museum also features an exhibition dedicated to the Dutch East Indies, which is well worth a visit. It tells gripping stories of those who experienced WWII in Indonesia, a former Dutch colony. This lesser-known history is fascinating. Anecdotes and authentic objects provide insight into the hardships of the Dutch, the colonists, Indonesians and Chinese. The Japanese occupiers interned a large part of the civilians living in the Dutch East Indies into camps. The men, women and children in these camps, as well as the Indonesian people who lived outside them, lived in great poverty and hunger. They were liberated in August 1945, several months after the Netherlands was freed.

The Dutch Resistance Museum

Photo credits

  • Hidden gun of a resistance fighter: damian entistle, Flickr
  • The Dutch Resistance Museum: Merijn Soeters