KLM uses cookies.

KLM’s websites use cookies and similar technologies. KLM uses functional cookies to ensure that the websites operate properly and analytic cookies to make your user experience optimal. Third parties place marketing and other cookies on the websites to display personalised advertisements for you. These third parties may monitor your internet behaviour through these cookies. By clicking ‘agree’ next to this or by continuing to use this website, you thereby give consent for the placement of these cookies. If you would like to know more about cookies or adjusting your cookie settings, please read KLM’s cookie policy.

Tarayıcınız güncel görünmüyor.
KLM.com’un tüm özelliklerini güvenli biçimde kullanmak için, tarayıcınızı güncellemenizi veya farklı bir tarayıcı seçmenizi öneririz. Bu versiyon ile devam etmeniz web sitesinin bazı bölümlerinin düzgün biçimde görüntülenmemesine yol açabilir. Ayrıca, kişisel bilgileriniz güncellenmiş bir tarayıcı ile daha iyi korunabilir.

 

Surfing, snorkelling and sunbathing

Swaying palm trees, golden-yellow sandy beaches and a tropical blue sea: these are not the first images that spring to mind when thinking about China. After all, China is not a beach holiday destination. At least, that’s what lots of visitors think – yet nothing could be further from the truth.

Depending on how you measure it, China’s jagged coastline extends between 14,000 and 30,000 km. Here you will find countless beaches, ranging from the northern beaches close to the capital of Beijing to the tropical snorkelling paradises of the South China Sea. So don’t forget to pack your swimsuit!

Beach at Wuzhizhou Island
Beach at Wuzhizhou Island

Rest in the north

There are many secluded beaches around Dalian in the north-east, often between impressive rock formations. This is a lovely place to come and relax when visiting Qingdao, a metropolis on the other side of the water. The most beautiful beach in Dalian is Bangchuidao. Just the way there is well worth the journey as the surrounding hills are full of cypress and pine trees. When you arrive, you will see a remarkably clean beach which faces a deserted island, an easy swimming distance from the coast. The hotel of the same name, in the corner of the bay, is equally as romantic as its surroundings.

The rugged coast around Dalian

Sand next to the slot machine

Macau was the first and last Portuguese colony in East Asia. The archipelago has become a famous holiday destination, mainly because of its casinos and Portuguese heritage. Macau is a city of Mediterranean avenues, cathedrals and fortresses, which often still feels distinctly Portuguese. The southernmost of the three islands, Coloane, is also the quietest. There are two beaches here at the foot of the Alto de Coloane. The golden sands of Cheoc Van invite sun worshippers, while the black sand of the slightly more distant Hac Sa is somewhat less photogenic but still very popular – especially thanks to the many beach bars situated along its 4-kilometre stretch. This is also the location of Restaurante Fernando, a seafood restaurant with the best views of Macau. What more could you ask for?

View over Coloane

Hainan: China's Hawaii

Hainan Island is the southernmost part of China. It is at more or less the same latitude as the islands of Hawaii, which it bears a small resemblance to. Sanya, a city on the south side of the island, is known for having the only true tropical beaches in China and coconut trees grow in what is perhaps the whitest sand in the country. The bays of Dadonghai and Yalong are home to resorts so luxurious that some beach villas have their own pools. If you opt to explore the South China Sea with a snorkel, you’ll discover a wonderful undersea world of red coral, tropical fish, marvellous seashells and huge turtles.

Sanya, the paradise of China

Photo credits

  • The rugged coast around Dalian: dmytrok, Flickr
  • View over Coloane: Olaer / Elmer Anthony, Flickr